Disabled Passengers Forced To Wait Hours On Planes At Heathrow

Same Difference

Disabled passengers arriving at Heathrow airport are being forced to wait up to two hours for help in disembarking aircraft, the aviation regulator has said.

The west London hub is one of four airports where the Civil Aviation Authority judged the service for wheelchair users and other disabled passengers to be poor . The others were Manchester, East Midlands and Exeter.

A survey of almost 1,200 passengers who have used Heathrow’s assistance service found that 62% rated it as poor or very poor.

The CAA recorded instances of passengers not being met on board arriving aircraft and not being treated with dignity and respect. On some occasions passengers were encouraged to make their own way through the airport because of a lack of staff or equipment.

The CAA’s consumer enforcement manager, James Fremantle, said: “There have been a number of occasions where people have had to wait one to two…

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Misleading missed delivery cards posted through letterboxes | Action Fraud

Residents are being warned about ‘something for you’ cards arriving through letterboxes designed to look like they have come from Royal Mail.

Source: Misleading missed delivery cards posted through letterboxes | Action Fraud

Grandparent Phone Scams Continue – Hoax-Slayer

COUNCIL TAX REBATE CON

This item is from the Action Fraud website

Sharp rise in reports of council tax rebate fraudsters at work

28th July 2017

Fraudsters may be posing as local council officials or professionals and cold-calling customers stating that they are eligible for a general tax or council tax rebate, with a sharp increase in the number of reports relating to fake council tax refunds in the last few weeks.

They’ve been reported to calling potential victims or use a range of other techniques, such as send text messages, to convince the intended victims that their tax rebate is legitimate, when in fact this may not be the case. The fraudsters will tell you how much tax you can claim back but emphasise that an advance fee payment is required in order to make the tax claim successful.

Whilst it may not be easy to identify if a tax rebate is legitimate, you should take care and know for certain that the tax you are planning to claim is genuine. A genuine company or organisation will never ask you for an advance fee payment to cover the administration costs in order to claim tax.

Protect yourself from tax rebate fraud

  • Make vigorous checks if you ever get a cold call associated with a tax rebate.
  • Never take up offers of tax rebates on the spot from cold calls and texts messages. Take a look at the recent tax rebate scams by HMRC – the same technique of offering an enticing-looking refund can be applied to private companies and public organisations.
  • Don’t give your bank account details or sensitive information to anyone without carrying out your own research on them.
  • Get independent financial advice before claiming any form of tax refund.
  • Check the caller’s credentials. Ask if they have a permanent business address and landline telephone number. Any mobile numbers given by fraudsters are often pay-as-you-go numbers which are virtually impossible to trace.
  • Always check a company’s contact details (such as a website, address and phone number) are correct and that they registered in the UK.

Have you been affected by council tax refund fraud?

If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to us.

This item is from the Action Fraud website

ACID ATTACKS IN OUR AREA

This item is from the Hackney Gazette Website.

Teen arrested after five moped acid attacks in Hackney and Islington

PUBLISHED: 08:08 14 July 2017 | UPDATED: 08:12 14 July 2017

Deliveroo and UberEATS drivers at the scene in Hackney Road last night. Picture: @sarah_cobbold/PA Wire

Deliveroo and UberEATS drivers at the scene in Hackney Road last night. Picture: @sarah_cobbold/PA Wire

Police are appealing for witnesses after acid was thrown by moped riders in Hackney and Islington last night.

The five incidents, in a 72-minute spree, are believed to be linked. A male in his teens was arrested on suspicion of grievous bodily harm and robbery. He is currently in custody.

At 10.25pm, cops were called to Hackney Road’s junction with Queensbridge Road, in Haggerston, to a robbery. They found a 32-year-old man, believed to be a food delivery driver, suffering from facial injuries.

The victim had been on a moped when another moped, with two male riders, pulled up alongside him. The males threw a corrosive substance in the victim’s face, with one stealing his moped and the other making off on the moped they arrived on. The man has been taken to hospital. His injuries are not life threatening or life changing.

Following this incident, at 11.05pm a corrosive substance was reported to have been thrown in the face of a man (police said no further details are available) by two males on a moped in Shoreditch High Street. The victim was taken to hospital. His injuries are not life threatening or life changing.

At 11.18pm, police received a call to a similar incident, a robbery in Cazenove Road, Stoke Newington, where a corrosive substance had been thrown. Officers attended and found a man suffering from facial injuries. He was taken to his hospital and his injuries are described as life-changing.

A fourth incident was reported to police at 11.37pm in Chatsworth Road, Lower Clapton. A man said he had been on his moped in traffic when two males on a moped pulled up alongside him and sprayed liquid in his face. They stole his moped and made off.

The victim (again, police said no further details are available) made his way home before calling the police. He was taken to hospital. His injuries are not life threatening and not-life changing.

Following the incidents in Hackney, officers were made aware of a similar attack in Islington. At 10.49pm hours, a man was reported to have had a corrosive substance thrown in his face by two males on a moped in Upper Street’s junction with Highbury Corner. He was taken to hospital but the police had no updates on his condition.

Any witnesses, anyone with information or anyone in possession of footage of these incidents should call police on 101. To remain anonymous you can call Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

This item is from the Hackney Gazette Website.

 

 

Seven ways to spot an online shopping scam – AOL UK Money

Blithehale Health Centre Patients Blog

A million people in the UK fell victim to online shopping scams last year, some of them several times, and this kind of crime is showing no signs of slowing. According to Gumtree, 93% of the population cannot tell an online scam from a bargain, so

Source: Seven ways to spot an online shopping scam – AOL UK Money

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WARNING – FAKE PET AUCTIONS

BEWARE OF FAKE PET AUCTIONS

Puppy 1

This article is from the Action Fraud Alert Website.

Pet – Fraud Alert

Alert message sent 04/07/2017 18:31:00

Information sent on behalf of Action Fraud (National Fraud Intelligence Bureau)

The National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB) and Action Fraud have recently noticed a rise in the reporting of pets, and in particular puppies and kittens, being advertised for sale via popular online auction websites. The fraudsters will place an advert of the pet for sale, often claiming that the pet is currently held somewhere less accessible or overseas. Upon agreement of a sale, the suspect will usually request an advance payment by money transfer or bank transfer. However, the pet does not materialise and the fraudster will subsequently ask for further advanced payments for courier charges, shipping fees and additional transportation costs. Even if further payments are made, the pet will still not materialise as it is likely to not exist.
Tips to staying safe when purchasing pets:

  • Stay within auction guidelines.
  • Be cautious if the seller initially requests payment via one method, but later claims that due to ‘issues with their account’ they will need to take the payment via an alternative method such as a bank transfer.
  • Consider conducting research on other information provided by the seller, for example a mobile phone number or email address used by the seller could alert you to any negative information associated with the number/email address online.
  • Request details of the courier company being used and consider researching it.
  • Agree a suitable time to meet face-to-face to agree the purchase and to collect the pet. If the seller is reluctant to meet then it could be an indication that the pet does not exist.
  • A genuine seller should be keen to ensure that the pet is going to a caring and loving new home. If the seller does not express any interest in you and the pet’s new home, be wary.
  • If you think the purchase price is too good to be true then it probably is, especially if the pet is advertised as a pure-breed.
  • Do not be afraid to request copies of the pet’s inoculation history, breed paperwork and certification prior to agreeing a sale. If the seller is reluctant or unable to provide this information it could be an indication that either the pet does not exist or the pet has been illegally bred e.g. it originates from a ‘puppy farm’. A ‘puppy farm’ is a commercial dog breeding enterprise where the sole aim is to maximise profit for the least investment. Commercial dog breeders must be registered with their local authority and undergo regular inspections to ensure that the puppies are bred responsibly and are in turn fit and healthy. Illegally farmed puppies will often be kept in inadequate conditions and are more likely to suffer from ailments and illnesses associated with irresponsible breeding.
  • When thinking of buying a pet, consider buying them in person from rescue centres or from reputable breeders.
  • If you have been affected by this, or any other type of fraud, report it to Action Fraud by visiting  www.actionfraud.police.uk or by calling 0300 123 2040.
Message sent by
Action Fraud (Action Fraud, Administrator, National)