PRODUCT RECALL IN USA – VENTALIN

Blithehale Health Centre Patients Blog

DON’T PANIC

JUST CHECK YOUR BATCH NUMBERS AND EXPIRY DATES

(on the box or the bottom of the cartridge)

THIS WARNING WAS ISSUED IN THE U.S.A. – NOT GREAT BRITAIN

Recall Alert! Check Your Child’s Inhalers ASAP

Nearly 600,000 inhalers were just voluntarily recalled nationwide by GlaxoSmithKline due to “defective delivery system,” with a large number of units having “out of specification results for leak rate” (possible package leakage).

The FDA describes the affected inhalers as prescription-only “Ventolin HFA (albuterol sulfate) Inhalation Aerosol, 90 mcg per actuation, 200 metered inhalations, net weight 18 g inhalers.” The recall is classified as “Class II,” which means “the products might cause a temporary health problem, or pose only a slight threat of a serious nature,” the FDA reports.

To see if your child’s inhaler is affected by this recall, see the lot numbers and expiration…

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LAW ABIDING CITIZEN E-MAIL ALERT

THE ACTION FRAUD ALERT SERVICE ARE CIRCULATING

THE FOLLOWING

URGENT ALERT WARNING

Fraudsters are sending out a high volume of phishing emails to personal and business email addresses, pretending to come from various email addresses, which have been compromised.

The subject line contains the recipient’s name, and the main body of text is as below:

“Hi, [name]!

I am disturbing you for a very serious reason. Although we are not familiar, but I have significant amount of individual info concerning you. The thing is that, most likely mistakenly, the data of your account has been emailed to me.

For instance, your address is:

[real home address]

I am a law-abiding citizen, so I decided to personal data may have been hacked. I attached the file – [surname].dot that I received, that you could explore what info has become obtainable for scammers. File password is – 2811

Best Wishes,”

The emails include an attachment – a ‘.dot’ file usually titled with the recipient’s name.

This attachment is thought to contain the Banking Trojan Ursniff/Gozi, hidden within an image in the document. The Ursniff Banking Trojan attempts to obtain sensitive data from victims, such as banking credentials and passwords. The data is subsequently used by criminals for monetary gain.

Protect Yourself:

Having up-to-date virus protection is essential; however it will not always prevent your device(s) from becoming infected.

Please consider the following actions:

  • Don’t click on links or open any attachments you receive in unsolicited emails or SMS messages: Remember that fraudsters can ‘spoof’ an email address to make it look like one used by someone you trust. If you are unsure, check the email header to identify the true source of communication (you can find out how by searching the internet for relevant advice for your email provider).
  • Do not enable macros in downloads; enabling macros will allow Trojan/malware to be installed onto your device.
  • Always install software updates as soon as they become available. Whether you are updating the operating system or an application, the update will often include fixes for critical security vulnerabilities.
  • Create regular backups of your important files to an external hard drive, memory stick or online storage provider. It is important that the device you back up to is not connected to your computer as any malware infection could spread to that as well.
  • If you think your bank details have been compromised, you should contact your bank immediately.

If you have been affected by this or any other fraud, report it to Action Fraud by calling 0300 123 2040, or visit www.actionfraud.police.uk.

 

 

 

DVLA SCAM WARNING

FACEBOOK WARNING OF DVLA SCAM

 

DVLA Scam Warning

 

FAKE BARNET AND UKCP PARKING TICKET CARRIES MALWARE

WARNING – THIS SCAM HAS RETURNED

BEWARE OF FAKE  BARNET COUNCIL

AND UKPC PARKING TICKET .

E-MAIL LINK CARRIES MALWARE.

The Action Fraud service is warning that they are receiving more and more warnings of a vicious e-mail link placed onto fake Barnet Council and UKPC parking tickets.

THE LATEST VERSION OF THIS SCAM IS  :

LONDON BOROUGH OF BARNET,

PENALTY CHARGE NOTICE

BARNET MALWARE PARKING NOTICE

IF YOU RECEIVE THIS, DO NOT USE ANY OF THE LINKS –

THEY LEAD TO DANGEROUS MALWARE.

This is the original warning from the Action Fraud website.

Fake UKPC parking ticket emails loaded with malware

10th November 2016

Fraudsters are sending out emails purporting to be from a legitimate company called UK Parking Control LTD (UKPC) that claim you have a parking ticket. 

The convincing looking emails entitled “Parking Charge Reminder” claim you have parked on one of UKPC’s client’s private land.

The bottom of the email asks victims to click on “payment options and photos” for more information – a link that is likely to contain malware. If you receive one of these emails, delete it, do not download the attachment and report it to us.

The emails contain randomly generated reference numbers and quote a charge of £90. UKPC have received hundreds of calls today from worried recipients and have confirmed that they would never contact people in this way.

To report a fraud and cyber crime and receive a police crime reference number, call us on 0300 123 2040 or use our online fraud reporting tool.

That was the original warning from the Action Fraud website.

Neil Trotter Lottery Win Advance Fee Scams

FROM HOAX SLAYER: Neil Trotter Lottery Win Advance Fee Scams

Outline:
Emails notify recipients that they have been selected to receive a large donation from UK Euromillions lottery winner Neil Trotter.


Brief Analysis:
The emails are not from Neil Trotter and the recipients have not been awarded any money. Neil Trotter really did win a large lottery prize, but he is not randomly giving away millions of pounds to strangers via email. The messages are advance fee scams designed to trick recipients into sending money and personal information to criminals.

Example:
Subject: Euromillion Winner!!!Perfect Grettings,My name is Neil Trotter the current winner of 108 million Pounds on the just concluded Euromillion Jackpot Draw for 2014, and i bring to you a perfect good news for such a perfect timing as this. I know this is surprising for you to have received this at this very early stage.
But because i just received the cheque on Friday 14th of March 2014 and i am excited, so i am willing to donate 1,000,000(One Million Great Britain Pounds) to you and as part of my effort to alleviate poverty and care for the less priveledged around the world,i have decided to donate to just 15 people around the globe which you are a part of.

so do get back to us quickly via email at: neiltrotter002@163.com

Perfect Regards.
Neil Trotter.

 

Example:
I am Neil TrotterLets do this charity togetherRevert back via only (neil330trot39onchadon@gmail.com)

(Text in attached Microsoft Word document)

Perfect Greetings,

My name is Neil Trotter the current winner of 108 million Pounds on the Euro million Jackpot Draw for 2014, and i bring to you perfect good news for such a perfect timing as this. I know this is surprising for you to have received this at this stage But because of my last year unexpected blessings am excited so i am willing to donate 5,000,000(five Million Great Britain Pounds) to you and as part of my effort to alleviate poverty and care for the less privileged around the world have decided to donate to just 5 people around the globe which you are a part of. <

so do get back me quickly via my personal email at (neil330trot39onchadon@gmail.com)

Do Provide the following information below when contacting me

Name:
Address:
Country of Residence:
Mobile Number:
Age:

Perfect Regards.
Neil Trotter.

 

Example:
Hi,My name is Neil Trotter a recent winner of 107.9Million Pounds in the EuroMillion Jackpot Draw for March 2014. I have decided to donate part of my win to few persons around the globe and you are lucky to be one of them. I am willing to donate (One Million Pounds) to you as part of my effort to help alleviate poverty and with this you can carter for the less privileged ones in your society. I know it is surprising for you to have received this notification at this very time but, I believe this is the right time and I will be glad if you are willing to receive this donation and help out as well.Do get back to me quickly via email at: neiltrotteruk@126.com

Best Regards,
Neil Trotter.

Detailed Analysis:
Winners of large lotteries such as Euromillions are generally the subjects of various mainstream news reports. These reports tend to name the winners and discuss their backgrounds and future plans.

This is fertile ground for scammers who are quick to capitalise on news of such wins. The scammers are able to provide ‘evidence’ of their spurious claims by linking to one or more of these news reports.

In March 2014, Neil Trotter, a UK car mechanic won a whopping 107 million pounds in the Euromillions lottery. Soon after, emails like the examples above began to be distributed.

Of course, the emails are not from Neil Trotter or anybody associated with him. And the recipients have not been awarded any portion of his winnings. The emails are typical advance fee scams designed to trick users into sending their money and personal information to criminals.

Those who reply as instructed will soon receive follow-up emails from the criminals who will continue to pretend that they are Neil Trotter. The emails will claim that, before they can receive their unexpected windfall, recipients must first pay for various fees associated with transferring the funds. The scammers will invent expenses such as insurance fees, taxation, banking fees, and legal costs. They will insist that, for legal reasons, these fees must be paid in advance.

If a victim complies and sends money as requested, further demands for money will follow. Often, requests for further fees will continue until the victim has nothing more to send or at last realises that he or she is being scammed. All of the money sent will line the pockets of the criminals and it is very unlikely that victims will ever get it back.

And, to make matters worse, the scammers may have been able to trick their victim into sending a large amount of personal and financial information. This information may later be used to steal the victim’s identity.

Be very wary of any email purporting to be from a lottery winner that claims that you have been awarded a large donation or grant. Lottery winners often do give away portions of their winnings to charity. However, they are extremely unlikely to randomly hand out millions of pounds to total strangers via email. Such a claim is simply absurd.

Advance Fee Lottery Scams

 

Shampoo Survey Scam – “You Wont Use Head and Shoulder Shampoo Again” – Hoax-Slayer 2G

Shampoo Survey Scam – “You Wont Use Head and Shoulder Shampoo Again”By Brett M. Christensen On March 8, 2017

In Facebook Scams, Scams. Tagged Facebook, scam, survey scam

Outline:Facebook message featuring a video teaser image depicting a strange growth on a person’s shoulder claims that the growth was caused by using a type of shampoo. The message advises users to click a link and watch the “most shocking video ever seen” to learn more.Brief Analysis:The message is a scam designed to trick you into spamming your Facebook friends and participating in bogus online surveys. The claim that the supposed growth was caused by shampoo is a lie. Nor is it any sort of “government warning” as claimed in some versions of the scam. The fake image uses a manipulated picture of a lotus seedpod and is similar to a long running hoax that supposedly depicts a breast rash that harboured live larvae. Do not click any links in this scam message.

Example:Shampoo Survey Scam

Example:GOVERNMENT WARNING: You Will Never Use This Bath Shampoo After Viewing This!You must watch this video to save yourself and your family from this diseaseShampoo Warning Facebook ScamDetailed Analysis:A post currently being distributed on Facebook claims that you won’t use Head and Shoulder shampoo ever again after you click to see the video. An earlier version purports to be a ‘Government Warning’ and claims that a type of ‘bath shampoo’ is causing a disease that you and your family need to know about.The post features an image of a strange growth on a person’s shoulder. The message advises you to click the image to view a video with more information.However, the claims in the message are lies. It is certainly not any type of government warning. The ‘bath shampoo’ disease depicted in the image does not exist and there is no video. The teaser image of the shoulder growth is the result of digital manipulation.

If you click on the image in the post, you will be taken to a fake Facebook Page that supposedly hosts the video. But, when you attempt to play the video, a pop-up message will advise that you must first share the Page as a means of proving that you are the owner of the Facebook account.But, even if you dutifully share the scam page with all of your Facebook friends as instructed, you will still not get to see the promised video. Instead, you will be taken to a fake YouTube page that once again appears to host the video.But, another pop-up message will inform you that, before you can view the footage, you must first participate in an online survey, ostensibly to ‘verify your age’.

The message contains a list of links to various surveys.However, even after completing several surveys, you will still not get to see the video, which never existed to begin with.The surveys will try to get you to provide your personal information and enter your mobile phone number, supposedly to go in the draw for various prizes. But, by submitting your mobile number, you will actually be subscribing to an absurdly expensive SMS ‘service’ that will be charged at several dollars per text message. And, the details you provide may be shared with other Internet marketing groups and you may subsequently be inundated with unwanted phone calls, emails and junk mail.

Meanwhile, the scammer responsible for the fake message will earn money via an affiliate marketing system each time a victim participates in a survey.The bogus image used in the scam message appears to have been created by taking a photograph of a lotus seedpod and digitally combining it with a photograph of a person’s shoulder.The image is strongly reminiscent of a long-running hoax image that supposedly depicts a larvae infested rash on a woman’s breast. The breast rash image was also created using a picture of a lotus seedpod.

‘Shocking video’ scams like this one are now very common on Facebook. Be wary of any message that claims that you can view ‘shocking video’ or ‘breaking news video’ by clicking a teaser image or link.

If you do click on one of these messages, and subsequent pages claim that you must share the information and/or participate in surveys before you can view the footage, do not proceed.

Source: Shampoo Survey Scam – “You Wont Use Head and Shoulder Shampoo Again” – Hoax-Slayer 2G

HOAX WARNING ABOUT PARACETAMOL

Blithehale Health Centre Patients Blog

HOAX WARNING CIRCULATING ABOUT INFECTED PARACETAMOL SHOULD BE IGNORED.

THE HOAX SLAYER NETWORK HAS RELEASED THE FOLLOWING NOTICE:

Example:

URGENT WARNING!

Be careful not to take the paracetamol that comes written P / 500. It is a new, very white and shiny paracetamol, doctors prove to contain “Machupo” virus, considered one of the most dangerous viruses in the world. And with high mortality rate. Please share this message, for all people and family. And save life from them ….. I’ve done my part, now it’s your turn … remember that God helps those who help.

Machupo Virus Paracetamol Warning Hoax

Detailed Analysis:
This “urgent” message, which is circulating rapidly via social media, warns you not to take a new “very white and shiny” type of paracetamol tablets that are labelled “P/500 “. Supposedly, doctors have found that this type of paracetamol contains the “Machupo” virus. According to the message, Machupo is one of the most dangerous viruses in…

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